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Do Your Finances Spark Joy?

Unless you’ve been living in a cupboard for the last year or so, you’ve probably heard of Mari Kondo – currently featuring in the hugely popular Netflix series Tidying Up With Marie Kondo. Kondo is a Japanese organization guru and bestselling author who has risen to practically rock star status based on her expertise with tidying up one’s personal space (she’s even been named one of Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people).
Her approach to improving one’s home is known as the KonMari method and involves six key steps:
– commit yourself to tidying up
– imagine your ideal lifestyle
– finish discarding first
– tidy by category, not location
– follow the right order
– ask yourself if each possession sparks joyThe key phrase there is identifying what in your life speaks to your heart. The goal of the entire effort is to simplify your life by being mindful about what you own and, ultimately, becoming happier with your life.Those in personal finance circles have taken notice of the KonMari method and are abuzz about how the same approach and principles can be applied to managing one’s money in a much more fruitful, streamlined, and fulfilling way. And it makes perfect sense. Because if you can declutter your house, can’t you similarly declutter your spending?“Marie Kondo helps people decide what it is you value in your life,” explains Scott Henderson, an accredited financial counselor “It’s about how you can use money to live a more joyful life and then cut out everything else.”Want to give your finances the KonMari treatment? Here’s how to get started.1. Be aware of where your money is going.

2. Now check your values around spending.

3. Clean up and de-clutter.

4. Tidy up by spending category.

5. Access joy – by shifting your mindset from ‘What can I afford?” to ‘What do I value?’”

Once you’ve completed these steps, you’ll find you start evaluating your purchase decisions based on what will really bring you joy over the long term, rather than simply living for the short term rush

Taken from an article written by Mia Taylor and published in The Simple Dollar. Read the full article here
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